Germany

Arts, Culture & Media

To understand life in East Germany, all you need is this board game

The board game called Bürokratopoly isn't about getting filthy rich, though players might feel filthy after they're done playing. The popular German game was created by dissidents in communist East Germany years ago as a satire about power and corruption. Now it has become a teaching tool for German kids trying to understand what it was like to live in the Communist East.

Global Scan

Now you can have airline food without leaving the ground

Frequent fliers at least get points for suffering through airline cuisine. Soon Germans will get the option of having it delivered to their homes. And what does a business class meal cost on the ground? About $12. Newly-released files from Britain's National Archives confirm that the country's WWII spies had to pass a seduction test by "special agent" Fifi. And 50 South Koreans will experience an oxymoron — competitive relaxation. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An ancient lost Mayan city reappears in Mexico

The Mayan civilization thrived more than a thousand years ago. Many of its cities simply disappeared as jungle overtook them. One of them was found decades ago and then lost again, until now. We also report on why women may be bearing the brunt of Ebola's attack in West Africa, and how Syrian cyber-warriors are using viral clickbait to trap enemies of the Syrian regime. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

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When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Arts, Culture & Media

What happened to Jewish survivors who stayed in the former East Germany after the Holocaust?

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It’s nearly seventy years since World War II ended. In that time, many historians have documented what happened to Germany’s Jews under the Nazis. But less attention has been paid to what happened to Jewish survivors who stayed in Germany after the Holocaust – particularly the Jews who settled in the former East Germany, or the GDR as it was called. Now a new German play addresses some of that history.