Egypt

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Arts, Culture & Media

Two cartoonists in Egypt push the boundaries of what's acceptable and find a ready audience

You're barely 20, you're Egyptian and you're a political cartoonist. You hone your craft during the 2011 revolution and learn all the tricks around criticizing authority. After the revolution, you think everything is fair game. But then your editors start rejecting your cartoons and you wonder why your older colleagues seem all too willing to tow the line. What do you do? Like any good millennial, you head to social media, zines, and the parallel media universe online. Meet Anwar and Andeel, two of Egypt's most daring political cartoonists.