Egypt

Global Politics

In dealing with ISIS, Obama could take cues from the Camp David Accords

The nature of war is that it’s impossible to predict its outcome, and the current military campaign against ISIS is no exception. But some conflicts can have peaceful conclusions — like the Camp David Accords that ended the Israel-Egypt conflict. Author Lawrence Wright argues that we can turn to the diplomacy of Jimmy Carter to learn how to deal with ISIS.

Global Scan

If Egypt feels too dicey to visit, now you can walk around there with Google

Tourism is way down in Egypt due to the last three years of political unrest there. But if you have always wanted to explore the pyramids, Google Street View is now ready to help you. As the US prepares for war on ISIS, the terrorist group has extended its propaganda front with a western-focused, cutting-edge video production wing. And we ask whether western media should show the gruesome images coming from war and terrorism, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Egypt's oldest pyramid is being destroyed by a repair effort

Egypt's ancient pyramids are a huge part of the country's history, culture and economy. That's why a government decision to give an important rehabilitation contract to a country with a bad track-record has invited so much scrutiny. The bad news is it seems critics fears are already coming true. Meanwhile, monkeys actually learn — and seem to want to learn — from watching video. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

An Eritrean refugee endured brutal torture. But he may find hope on a ranch in California

Philemon Semere has a harrowing story to tell. For seven months, the Eritrean refugee was held captive in the middle of the Sinai desert for a huge ransom. He managed to be set free last year after his family paid some of the $25,000 his captors demanded. Now, an American woman is offering him a place to stay and work — on her remote ranch in California.

Global Scan

Russia demands that Bulgaria treat Soviet memorials with a little respect

Monuments showing heroic Soviet soldiers dot many of the former USSR satellite countries. And since the end of the Cold War, they have been refashioned by activists into political statements, infuriating Russian officials. In Africa, social media networks have been spreading a folk 'cure' for Ebola. And the Israeli government has kept independent human rights investigators out of Gaza. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

How cement could de-rail the Gaza peace talks

With the cease-fire holding in Gaza, both sides are now facing the difficult task of negotiating a lasting truce. This involves huge political issues. But also some very mundane issues, which could de-rail any settlement. For instance, cement. Cement is obviously needed for reconstruction. But Israel doesn't want Hamas to re-build its tunnels.

Conflict & Justice

How cement could de-rail the Gaza peace talks

With the cease-fire holding in Gaza, both sides are now facing the difficult task of negotiating a lasting truce. This involves huge political issues. But also some very mundane issues, which could de-rail any settlement. For instance, cement. Cement is obviously needed for reconstruction. But Israel doesn't want Hamas to re-build its tunnels.

Global Scan

The Philippines is bowed, but not broken after Typhoon Haiyan

While aid organizations rush to help the Philippines recover from Typhoon Haiyan, there is at least some good news. Officials say the death toll should be between 2000 and 2500, rather than the 10,000 previously reported. Plus, Moscow allows subway riders to pay for their fares in squats. And Egypt stands as the worst Arab country for women. Those stories and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Chaos in Gaza

Thousands of Palestinians streamed into Egypt today, in spite of efforts by Egyptian authorities to close Gaza's southern border, as Anchor Marco Werman gets the latest from BBC Gaza correspondent Aleem Maqbool.

Conflict & Justice

Who's next in Egypt?

Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak is in Washington this week to speak with President Obama. But back at home, the big question is who will succeed the aging Egyptian leader. Ursula Lindsey reports from Cairo.