Egypt

Global Scan

Meet the US prison camp that helped give birth to ISIS

The US has long worried that its attempts to fight terrorism might actually spur more terrorism. We learn that a US detention camp in Iraq seems to have helped incubate ISIS. Meanwhile, it is Election Day in the US and an app lets Americans show their partisan choices as they shop. And an Egyptian bus driver found one heck of a way to fail a drug test. We have those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

In dealing with ISIS, Obama could take cues from the Camp David Accords

The nature of war is that it’s impossible to predict its outcome, and the current military campaign against ISIS is no exception. But some conflicts can have peaceful conclusions — like the Camp David Accords that ended the Israel-Egypt conflict. Author Lawrence Wright argues that we can turn to the diplomacy of Jimmy Carter to learn how to deal with ISIS.

Global Scan

If Egypt feels too dicey to visit, now you can walk around there with Google

Tourism is way down in Egypt due to the last three years of political unrest there. But if you have always wanted to explore the pyramids, Google Street View is now ready to help you. As the US prepares for war on ISIS, the terrorist group has extended its propaganda front with a western-focused, cutting-edge video production wing. And we ask whether western media should show the gruesome images coming from war and terrorism, all in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

How cement could de-rail the Gaza peace talks

With the cease-fire holding in Gaza, both sides are now facing the difficult task of negotiating a lasting truce. This involves huge political issues. But also some very mundane issues, which could de-rail any settlement. For instance, cement. Cement is obviously needed for reconstruction. But Israel doesn't want Hamas to re-build its tunnels.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

How cement could de-rail the Gaza peace talks

With the cease-fire holding in Gaza, both sides are now facing the difficult task of negotiating a lasting truce. This involves huge political issues. But also some very mundane issues, which could de-rail any settlement. For instance, cement. Cement is obviously needed for reconstruction. But Israel doesn't want Hamas to re-build its tunnels.

Global Scan

Egypt's oldest pyramid is being destroyed by a repair effort

Egypt's ancient pyramids are a huge part of the country's history, culture and economy. That's why a government decision to give an important rehabilitation contract to a country with a bad track-record has invited so much scrutiny. The bad news is it seems critics fears are already coming true. Meanwhile, monkeys actually learn — and seem to want to learn — from watching video. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Chaos in Gaza

Thousands of Palestinians streamed into Egypt today, in spite of efforts by Egyptian authorities to close Gaza's southern border, as Anchor Marco Werman gets the latest from BBC Gaza correspondent Aleem Maqbool.