China

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

This backcountry cook you've never heard of is a legend at Yosemite National Park

Ever heard of Sing Peak in Yosemite National Park? Turns out, it has nothing to do with music. It honors the park's Chinese immigrant past — and an amazing backcountry chef named Tie Sing. A park ranger at Yosemite did some digging and unearthed the hidden history of Sing and the immigrants who helped create the park we know today.

Global Politics

Harvard researchers went undercover to reveal Chinese censorship tactics on the Internet

We all know about the so-called ‘Great Firewall of China,” the half-joking term for the barrier set up to prevent Western media from being consumed in China. And most of us assume there is a great deal of additional censorship with China itself. But until Gary King of Harvard University found a way to peer directly at the inner workings of Chinese censorship, no one knew exactly how it was done or what the Chinese were most serious about censoring.

Global Scan

What's the next best thing to a roll in the mud with pigs?

Chinese pigs need a genetic upgrade, so Britain has graciously offered to help China at a $74 million per year price tag. China may not have bragged about its pigs, but an international test showed Chinese kids at the top of the class. But there's a catch. And Iceland grieves after the the police kill a man, for the first time in the country's history. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Is this China's environmental future?

Updated

China's notorious air pollution makes this photo of a digitally-presented sunrise in an ad seem very eerie. Uganda's president is reconsidering a widely-criticized anti-gay law that the country's parliament passed last month. And India's Olympic team just got the nod to head to Sochi, but can't represent the country. All that and more, in this special weekend edition of the Global Scan.

Global Politics

Olympic package

The World's Katy Clark reports on past instances when politics intruded on the Olympic Games; some activists would like to see a boycott of the Beijing Olympics that China will host in August.

Conflict & Justice

Burma and the Olympics

Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Simon Long, Asia editor for The Economist, about the possibility that close relations between China and Burma could become the focus of protests ahead of the Beijing Olympics in August.

Earthquake witness

Anne Zuckerman is a teacher at Sichuan University in Chengdu, China, and she was on campus when the powerful earthquake hit; Host Lisa Mullins speaks to Zuckerman about the earthquake -- and about having to evacuate her apartment.