China

Global Scan

Irish women ride the rails to protest restrictions on abortion

Women in Ireland resurrect a protest tactic from four decades ago to fight the country's restrictive abortion laws. While in China, police crack down on an alleged "brothel" run out of a university hotel. It apparently gave discounts to those who had a student ID. And if you are a gravedigger, or anyone with a professional, or morbid, interest in the dead, there's a new dating site for you. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Consumerism knows no bounds when it comes to taste

With Halloween coming, there's a great deal of hand-wringing over potentially offensive and racist Halloween costumes. This "Sexy Ebola Nurse' outfit isn't racist, but it probably is offensive. Meanwhile, in China, the country considers dropping counterfeiting from the long list of crimes subject to the death penalty, and a burglar runs into his victim at the bank. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

This backcountry cook you've never heard of is a legend at Yosemite National Park

Ever heard of Sing Peak in Yosemite National Park? Turns out, it has nothing to do with music. It honors the park's Chinese immigrant past — and an amazing backcountry chef named Tie Sing. A park ranger at Yosemite did some digging and unearthed the hidden history of Sing and the immigrants who helped create the park we know today.

Global Politics

Harvard researchers went undercover to reveal Chinese censorship tactics on the Internet

We all know about the so-called ‘Great Firewall of China,” the half-joking term for the barrier set up to prevent Western media from being consumed in China. And most of us assume there is a great deal of additional censorship with China itself. But until Gary King of Harvard University found a way to peer directly at the inner workings of Chinese censorship, no one knew exactly how it was done or what the Chinese were most serious about censoring.

Subprime crisis ripples in China

China's stock market closed today at its lowest level since July and analysts say it's the fallout from the US subprime mortgage crisis, as Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Gordon Chang, author of "The Coming Collapse of China."

Conflict & Justice

Tibet eyewitness

Anchor Marco Werman speaks to James Miles, China correspondent for The Economist, who also happened to be on a government-approved visit to Lhasa when anti-China protests broke out in the Tibetan capital.

Global Politics

China's internet protests

Protests in nine Chinese cities have called for a boycott of the French supermaket chain, Carrefour in response to a false rumor going around the internet that Carrefour was supporting Tibetan independence