China

Global Scan

Irish women ride the rails to protest restrictions on abortion

Women in Ireland resurrect a protest tactic from four decades ago to fight the country's restrictive abortion laws. While in China, police crack down on an alleged "brothel" run out of a university hotel. It apparently gave discounts to those who had a student ID. And if you are a gravedigger, or anyone with a professional, or morbid, interest in the dead, there's a new dating site for you. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Consumerism knows no bounds when it comes to taste

With Halloween coming, there's a great deal of hand-wringing over potentially offensive and racist Halloween costumes. This "Sexy Ebola Nurse' outfit isn't racist, but it probably is offensive. Meanwhile, in China, the country considers dropping counterfeiting from the long list of crimes subject to the death penalty, and a burglar runs into his victim at the bank. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

This backcountry cook you've never heard of is a legend at Yosemite National Park

Ever heard of Sing Peak in Yosemite National Park? Turns out, it has nothing to do with music. It honors the park's Chinese immigrant past — and an amazing backcountry chef named Tie Sing. A park ranger at Yosemite did some digging and unearthed the hidden history of Sing and the immigrants who helped create the park we know today.

Global Politics

Harvard researchers went undercover to reveal Chinese censorship tactics on the Internet

We all know about the so-called ‘Great Firewall of China,” the half-joking term for the barrier set up to prevent Western media from being consumed in China. And most of us assume there is a great deal of additional censorship with China itself. But until Gary King of Harvard University found a way to peer directly at the inner workings of Chinese censorship, no one knew exactly how it was done or what the Chinese were most serious about censoring.

Conflict & Justice

Tiananmen voices

The BBC's Chinese Service asked people to share some of their thoughts and recollections about China's Tiananmen crackdown 20 years ago today. Anchor Lisa Mullins introduces us to two of them

Arts, Culture & Media

Singapore's science dreams

Singapore is laying the foundation for a future economy based on science. It's sending its own citizens abroad for a top education, and enticing some the world's best minds in science to its shores. Reporter Ari Daniel Shapiro has more.

Global Politics

Win in China

Entrepreneurship is no longer a dirty word in China. Select businessmen, and a handful of women are now held up as powerful icons. Ole Schell traveled to the city of Weifang to profile an up-and-coming lingerie baron.

Global Politics

Climate: getting concrete in Beijing

On Tuesday, President Obama and his Chinese counterpart Hu Jintao agreed to cooperate on climate change and other important matters. Anchor Jeb Sharp talks with David Biello, the associate editor for environment and energy at Scientific American magazine.

Business, Finance & Economics

China's economic picture

China's economic picture is not as rosy as it might appear on first glance. The income gap between the urban rich and the rural poor is growing. And as correspondent Mary Kay Magistad reports, its time for China to rethink its export-driven economy.

Global Politics

Life in Palau after Guantanamo

The Obama Administration has been trying to find countries willing to take in several Uighur men who were detained at Guantanamo. Some have now been relocated to the tiny Pacific island nation of Palau. The World's Mary Kay Magistad has their story.

Conflict & Justice

Geo answer

The city of Nanjing, China, is the answer to our geo quiz today. Right now 22 people are on trial there for swapping sex partners. Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Stan Abrams, a lawyer and author of the blog China Hearsay.