China

Global Scan

Prince William's US trip seems more political than regal

When British royalty comes to the US, Americans go a little nuts. But this trip by Prince William has the Brits scratching their heads. Meanwhile, at least one British parliamentarian is looking to the US for ideas on how to deal with anti-abortion protesters. And the Chinese government is hunting for a corrupt Chinese official who was obsessed with gold.

Global Scan

Take a trip through London at night — with the lights off

Nights during a blackout in a big city offer a scary vision to some. But this new video shows how London's architecture would be set off by the night sky, if city lights weren't obscuring the view. Meanwhile, across the Channel, France has decided to pay foreign victims sent to Nazi camps in French trains. And China asks for US help to crack down on corrupt fugitives, in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

How do you capture a drug kingpin without firing a shot?

Over the weekend, US and Mexican officials teamed up to capture one of the Mexico's most notorious drug kingpins, El Chapo of the Sinaloa cartel. And they did it without firing a single shot. Meanwhile, all the gunfire and violence in Ukraine finally forced its president from power and into hiding, but his time is running out. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Subprime crisis ripples in China

China's stock market closed today at its lowest level since July and analysts say it's the fallout from the US subprime mortgage crisis, as Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Gordon Chang, author of "The Coming Collapse of China."

Conflict & Justice

Tibet eyewitness

Anchor Marco Werman speaks to James Miles, China correspondent for The Economist, who also happened to be on a government-approved visit to Lhasa when anti-China protests broke out in the Tibetan capital.