China

Global Scan

Scientists come a step closer to making Star Trek's tractor beam a reality

Science fiction has long envisioned "tractor" beams that could grab and move physical objects using a laser or other stream of energy. Now scientists have created one, at least on a small scale. And we have some advice if you use heat in the winter. Most Brits, and many of us, apparently don't know how to use our thermostats. Also, Chinese officials go on a worldwide corruption hunt, in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

This backcountry cook you've never heard of is a legend at Yosemite National Park

Ever heard of Sing Peak in Yosemite National Park? Turns out, it has nothing to do with music. It honors the park's Chinese immigrant past — and an amazing backcountry chef named Tie Sing. A park ranger at Yosemite did some digging and unearthed the hidden history of Sing and the immigrants who helped create the park we know today.

Global Politics

Harvard researchers went undercover to reveal Chinese censorship tactics on the Internet

We all know about the so-called ‘Great Firewall of China,” the half-joking term for the barrier set up to prevent Western media from being consumed in China. And most of us assume there is a great deal of additional censorship with China itself. But until Gary King of Harvard University found a way to peer directly at the inner workings of Chinese censorship, no one knew exactly how it was done or what the Chinese were most serious about censoring.

Arts, Culture & Media

Revisiting China

Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Canadian journalist Jan Wong about her new book, "A Comrade Lost and Found." In the early 1970s, Wong was one of only two Western exchange students at China's Beijing University. At one point Wong was approached by a Chinese student who wanted to go to the U.S. Wong, who supported Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution, reported the student to her teacher. Years later, a conscience-stricken Wong returned to China to try to trace the student and learn her fate.

Arts, Culture & Media

Man's best meal?

A new study suggests that people first began domesticating wolves�the ancestors of today's dogs�more for lunch than for loyalty. Anchor Marco Werman finds out more from Peter Savolainen, lead scientist on the study.

Global Politics

Trade with China

Zachary Karabell, author of 'Superfusion: How China and America Became One Economy and Why the World's Prosperity Depends On It,' explains just how intertwined the American and Chinese economies have become. From PRI's The World.

Arts, Culture & Media

Xiayin Wang

The music we're listening to is a composition by the 19th century Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. It comes from a recording titled ?Scriabin: Piano, Poems, Waltzes, Dances.? The pianist is the immensely talented young Chinese virtuoso Xiayin Wang.