China

Global Scan

Pakistan says it has captured the men who shot Malala in 2012

When Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head two years ago, the Taliban in Pakistan claimed responsibility. On Friday, the Pakistan army said it had caught a gang of 10 men behind the attack. Elsewhere in Pakistan, a new branch of al-Qaeda seems to have bungled its first attack, but wants the press coverage anyway. And a 45-story skyscraper of squatters is being cleared in Venezuela, all in this weekend's Global Scan.

Global Scan

The US says the crisis for Yazidis in Iraq is over — but the UN disagrees

Earlier this week, the US considered the possibility of sending American troops to rescue members of the Yazidi minority trapped by ISIS militants on Mount Sinjar in Iraq. Now, President Obama says the crisis has passed ... but others aren't so sure. And if you think women's rights are relatively new, guess again. And we explain why Ferguson, Missouri seems like a war zone, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Caught between Russian oil and EU trade, Ukraine now hopes to get both

Ukrainian leaders seem ready to appease protesters by signing a deal with the European Union, while still maintaining close ties with Russia. But will that stop the protests? We also look at the Turkish model of Islamic democracy, and China's guidelines for the media on what to remember —and not remember — about Nelson Mandela. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

An experiment in crowd-sourced news for China 'disappears' at the hands of government censors

China's not known for its press freedom — though its citizens are voracious consumers of news. A new site, Cenci, had taken the country's journalism world by storm ... until censors decided to make it invisible. Meanwhile in Boston, you can buy soup in bite-size, edible balls. It's a Harvard researcher's idea to cut plastic waste. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Science, Tech & Environment

Even your medical records aren't safe. Chinese group hacks into hospital's patient records

When you go to the hospital, you give up a lot of very personal data, not the least of which is your name, address and Social Security number. Recently, a group of Chinese hackers associated with their government's cyber espionage program branched out from their usual work and targeted a huge hospital system's patient database — and got away with a huge haul of personal date.