China

Science, Tech & Environment

A new book documents China’s exploitation of Tibet’s natural resources

The recent agreement between the US and China to reduce greenhouse emissions made headlines — and rightly so. It was a big step for both nations. But, striking a balance between environmental protection and economic ascendance is much more complicated than that. In China especially, it seems, for every step forward, there are often two steps back. Its actions in Tibet are a prime example, according to a newly-published book.

Global Scan

A US nursing association sides with a Navy nurse who refused to force-feed Gitmo prisoners

When a naval nurse decided that force-feeding prisoners on hunger strike in Guantanamo Bay was unethical, the potential career consequences were severe. Now fellow nurses are supporting the act of conscience. Meanwhile, a British couple gets fined for writing a critical hotel review on TripAdvisor. And Indian street vendors take on Walmart, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Protesters attack a Dutch Santa Claus tradition as blatantly racist

In the Netherlands, a Christmas holiday tradition is leading to protests, clashes and arrests. Meanwhile, Turkey's president wants to build a mosque in Cuba — to honor the Muslim sailors he says arrived in North American 300 years before Columbus. And China discloses how it tried to clear Beijing's polluted skies before welcoming last week's APEC leaders. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

'Magic' mushrooms to treat depression? Some researchers think so

Hallucinogenic mushrooms are one potential treatment for depression. Another is hip hop music — it seems the dark lyrics might reach those who feel equally hopeless. Meanwhile, Russian President Vladimir Putin comes to the rescue of China's first lady and his gallant act gets erased by Chinese censors. And in Pakistan, a group of schools hold an "I am not Malala" Day. All that and more in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Should the matching shirt summit tradition live or die?

In 2011, US President Barack Obama spared world leaders the indignity of sporting Aloha shirts at a summit in Honolulu. But the matching shirt tradition is a hard one to kill. Meanwhile, millions of Catalans cast a symbolic vote for independence from Spain on Sunday. And a once-secret recording shows Ronald Reagan at his most charming in defusing a crisis. All that in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Caught between Russian oil and EU trade, Ukraine now hopes to get both

Ukrainian leaders seem ready to appease protesters by signing a deal with the European Union, while still maintaining close ties with Russia. But will that stop the protests? We also look at the Turkish model of Islamic democracy, and China's guidelines for the media on what to remember —and not remember — about Nelson Mandela. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Rodman plays ball with North Korea's dictator

Basketball diplomacy, Dennis Rodman-style, keeps getting stranger. Scientists streak the South Pole and come away with frostbite in tender places. China overtakes Europe in R&D spending. And did you know that Hitchcock made a Holocaust documentary? All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Subprime crisis ripples in China

China's stock market closed today at its lowest level since July and analysts say it's the fallout from the US subprime mortgage crisis, as Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Gordon Chang, author of "The Coming Collapse of China."

Conflict & Justice

Tibet eyewitness

Anchor Marco Werman speaks to James Miles, China correspondent for The Economist, who also happened to be on a government-approved visit to Lhasa when anti-China protests broke out in the Tibetan capital.

Global Politics

China's internet protests

Protests in nine Chinese cities have called for a boycott of the French supermaket chain, Carrefour in response to a false rumor going around the internet that Carrefour was supporting Tibetan independence