China

Global Scan

This is where bitcoins are made

Bitcoins are big money these days. So bitcoin miners are setting up vast, secretive warehouses filled with computers to earn them. We explain how it works. Meanwhile, terrorist wannabes have a lot to learn, so they turn to "The Koran for Dummies" for a quick education. And superstitions about albinism have taken a cruel turn in Tanzania, all in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

That monkey selfie? The US government says it belongs to all of us

This cute selfie taken by a monkey who happened on a photographer's camera does not belong to the photographer. So say US regulators, who explain their reasoning. Meanwhile, China's effort to stop the desert's advance using trees has hit a snag. And chalk up another marketing fail — a lingerie line with the same name as a terrorist group. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Arts, Culture & Media

Revisiting China

Anchor Lisa Mullins speaks with Canadian journalist Jan Wong about her new book, "A Comrade Lost and Found." In the early 1970s, Wong was one of only two Western exchange students at China's Beijing University. At one point Wong was approached by a Chinese student who wanted to go to the U.S. Wong, who supported Chairman Mao's Cultural Revolution, reported the student to her teacher. Years later, a conscience-stricken Wong returned to China to try to trace the student and learn her fate.

Arts, Culture & Media

Man's best meal?

A new study suggests that people first began domesticating wolves�the ancestors of today's dogs�more for lunch than for loyalty. Anchor Marco Werman finds out more from Peter Savolainen, lead scientist on the study.

Global Politics

Trade with China

Zachary Karabell, author of 'Superfusion: How China and America Became One Economy and Why the World's Prosperity Depends On It,' explains just how intertwined the American and Chinese economies have become. From PRI's The World.

Arts, Culture & Media

Xiayin Wang

The music we're listening to is a composition by the 19th century Russian composer Alexander Scriabin. It comes from a recording titled ?Scriabin: Piano, Poems, Waltzes, Dances.? The pianist is the immensely talented young Chinese virtuoso Xiayin Wang.