Canada

Science, Tech & Environment

A way to save one of North America's fastest animals

For centuries, herds of pronghorn have traveled hundreds of miles across the west in the second longest land migration in North America. But today, pronghorn often encounter barbed wire fences on private and public land that delay or halt their journey. Now, scientists and wildlife managers are developing fencing systems that allow the pronghorn to cross safely.

Science, Tech & Environment

How a new prime minister will reshape Canada's environmental policies

The presidential race is heating up across America, but north of the border a new face from a fabled political dynasty just romped into power with a landslide win that signals considerable change. Gone is the oil-friendly Stephen Harper and taking over as prime minister is Justin Trudeau, son of popular leader Pierre Trudeau, of the left-leaning Liberal Party. What does this mean for controversial energy projects in Canada and the US?

Science, Tech & Environment

In the 'new North,' forest fires are permanently altering the landscape

The end of summer in the US has seen unprecedented and catastrophic wildfires along the Pacific coast, with whole neighborhoods burned to the ground in California. But the fire season up in Alaska and elsewhere in the far north was also devastating — and the eight million or more acres burned there raise some ominous questions about the future of permafrost and boreal forests.

Conflict & Justice

Bill Cosby is unlikely to face rape charges in court, but that wouldn't be the case in other countries

Allegations against Bill Cosby dating from decades ago have stirred a debate in the US over whether legal statutes of limitations should apply to sexual assault cases. Some countries, like Canada and the UK, don't have deadlines for prosecuting such cases, which has allowed prosecutors to open high-profile "historic cases" of assault with some success.

Business, Finance & Economics

How Canada tried to eradicate poverty with guaranteed income

For some residents of the Netherlands it will soon be money for nothing. Utrecht in the Netherlands just announced it would be experimenting with "basic income." That is, giving people on welfare a paycheck regardless of whether they get a job or not. This isn't the first experiment in handing out checks without strings. Economist Evelyn Forget studied a similar experiment in Manitoba in the 1970s.