Brazil

Lifestyle & Belief

South America has become a safe haven for the Catholic Church’s alleged child molesters. The Vatican has no comment.

The Catholic Church has long been under fire for covering up priests' sexual abuse of children, and for transferring perpetrators among parishes rather than turning them over to law enforcement. Now, GlobalPost investigates a new, international side to the scandal: The church has allowed priests facing credible sex abuse allegations in the United States and Europe to get a new start by relocating to poor parishes in South America.

Global Scan

Another gang rape in India, with a complex twist

A woman was sentenced by elders to a public gang rape in her village in the West Bengal area to punish her for an affair. India's Supreme Court is investigating. A signal room in London's Underground gets flooded, with quick-drying cement. And an artist is painting and placing cut-outs of immigrant workers around LA. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Brazil wins the title for most faked injuries in the World Cup

Updated

The drama has been intense on the field during the World Cup... and then there have been the games. The Wall Street Journal tallied up the theatrical moments of feigned injuries — and Brazil is the clear winner. At least in Brazil, women can attend the matches. Not so in Iran. And the US warns travelers away from visiting much of Africa, all in today's Global Scan.

Sports

How can the US advance in the World Cup?

The fate of the US national soccer team is still up in the air. After a heartbreaking draw against Portugal on Sunday, everything now rides on their final game against Germany on Thursday. Reporter and soccer player Anders Kelto explains what needs to happen for the US to make it to the next round of the World Cup.

Conflict & Justice

#BlackLivesMatter has gone global. And Brazil needs it — badly.

Latin America's largest nation is also one of the world's deadliest. And, just like in the US, violence in Brazil disproportionately affects young, non-white men. Now activists are fighting to draw attention to the problem of killings of young black Brazilian men, frequently by police. One of the leading local movements is Amnesty International’s “Jovem Negro Vivo,” meaning “Young Black Alive.”