Argentina

Sports

Which World Cup team are you cheering for and why?

Maybe you're among the lucky soccer fans travelling to Brazil to experience World Cup 2014 — or more likely you're watching as many of the the beautiful games as you can on cable. In any case there are 32 teams representing 32 countries that have earned the right to compete in Brazil. So how do you pick a World Cup team to cheer for?

Global Scan

iPhone won't stay charged? Blame Facebook

A German researcher and a former American Apple store employee both say iPhone battery problems are mainly caused by one app: Facebook. Meanwhile, Russians hear that the rest of the world's problems are all the fault of moral decay and political fascism outside the country. And in the developing world, a soccer ball was supposed to provide light for study, but is prone to break.

Global Scan

Could São Paulo's drought affect the World Cup this summer?

In today's Global Scan, São Paulo, the world's sixth largest city and a host city for this summer's World Cup, is running dry. Without more rain soon, rationing will have to start. North Korea normally blocks all contact with the West, but it has an exception — a university just for the sons of the elite. And Argentinians use an app to police prices in the supermarket.

Arts, Culture & Media

Global Hit: Mercedes Sosa

Argentines lined the streets of Buenos Aires today to honor a national hero. A hearse carried the body of folk singer Mercedes Sosa through the streets of the capital. Sosa died yesterday. She was 74 years old. Marco Werman has more.

Global Politics

Argentina's bailout

Argentina's President (Cristina Fern-ndez de Kirchner) this week announced plans to nationalize the country's private pension funds. Some see it it as a reasonable move in times of a financial crisis.

Sports

Soccer loyalty in Argentina

Argentina's soccer fans are united behind the country's World Cup team, but before the players come together for the country, they play for local club teams, and THAT'S where the fiercest loyalty lies. Julia Kumari Drapkin reports from Buenos Aires.