Afghanistan

Global Scan

Uganda says AIDS is on the rise because condoms are too small

Ugandan men are apparently loathe to use condoms because the international issue, one-size-fits-all version isn't big enough for them. And while that might seem like bragging or an excuse, Uganda is seeing AIDs infection rates, once tamed, on the rise again. Meanwhile, a court in New York is considering whether chimps should have some "human rights." And eating healthy really does cost more. All that, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

My affair? Next question...

François Hollande has long been under pressure for his policies. Now, he's under pressure around the details of an affair. Perhaps he needs a lesson from Abdul Saboor, praised as "Afghanistan's most honest man" in a country known for corruption. And is a woman on a swing a bit enticing? Some in Saudi Arabia say yes and want to stop it. All that and more, in today's Global Scan.

Global Scan

Are alleged ISIS passports a hoax?

When militants declared an Islamic Caliphate in Iraq and Syria, social media buzzed with photos and claims they were printing 11,000 passports. But a closer look at those photos suggests they are fake. Meanwhile, US Marines land in Iraq to scope out a mission to rescue people trapped by ISIS, and South Africa has its own humanitarian rescue, but for rhinos, in today's Global Scan.

Seeking a ban on cluster bombs

An international conference aimed at building support for a treaty banning the use of cluster bombs wrapped up in New Zealand today, and so far, 82 countries have signaled their support

Global Politics

Pakistan's effect on Afghanistan

The World's Quil Lawrence reports from Kabul, Afghanistan, on what Afghans expect a new Pakistani president will mean in the fight against the Taliban. The Taliban use parts of Pakistan as a safe haven for attacks across the border in Afghanistan.

Conflict & Justice

Pakistan and The Taliban

Pakistanis are increasingly ambivalent about supporting the war against terrorism and the Taliban on its border with Afghanistan. Many think a military solution won't work. The World's Aaron Schachter reports.