Europe

Global Scan

Should the US reconsider its support for African 'strongmen'

The United States has long made deals with foreign leaders out of expediency — and not shared values. But some of its allies in Africa are drawing increasing questions about what sort of governments the US is supporting. Meanwhile, British researchers are putting mummies through a CT scanner, and making surprising discoveries. That and more in today's Global Scan.

Arts, Culture & Media

An amazing collection of stolen German art may go back to the man who has been hiding it for decades

Updated

German prosecutors are trying to sort out what to do with a 1,400-piece collection of mostly Nazi looted art that was discovered two years ago. The investigation is proving to be a challenge. Competing claims on some works have surfaced and Germany's 30-year statute of limitations on stolen art has expired. German officials have now announced they'll return most of the art.

Global Politics

European Union prepares to adopt 24th official language as costs mount, calls for English rise

In the European Union, every language is an official language. Government officials speak in the official language of their country, and those comments are then translated into 22, soon to be 23, other languages. All of that costs $1.4 billion per year — and that total will increase when Croatian becomes an official language later this year.

Arts, Culture & Media

You wouldn't believe the situations a hard-working Lego photographer finds himself in

Everything is Awesome. That's the theme song to The Lego Movie, a recently released film that imagines a richly detailed life for its animated minifigure characters. But what's it like to be a working Lego stiff, a one-and-a-half-inch tall freelance Lego photographer? Andrew Whyte's been finding out. He's been carrying around a little Lego man for more than a year, photographing him every day, rain or shine.

Arts, Culture & Media

An amazing collection of stolen German art may go back to the man who has been hiding it for decades

Updated

German prosecutors are trying to sort out what to do with a 1,400-piece collection of mostly Nazi looted art that was discovered two years ago. The investigation is proving to be a challenge. Competing claims on some works have surfaced and Germany's 30-year statute of limitations on stolen art has expired. German officials have now announced they'll return most of the art.