Europe

Arts, Culture & Media

To understand life in East Germany, all you need is this board game

The board game called Bürokratopoly isn't about getting filthy rich, though players might feel filthy after they're done playing. The popular German game was created by dissidents in communist East Germany years ago as a satire about power and corruption. Now it has become a teaching tool for German kids trying to understand what it was like to live in the Communist East.

Lifestyle & Belief

Would you eat haggis?

Haggis imports have been outlawed in the United States since 1971. The ban was put in place because one of the key ingredients of haggis - sheep lungs - are prohibited in food products here. Now there is a fresh press by the UK government to try and overturn the import ban on traditional Scottish haggis.

Conflict & Justice

Geo answer

For today's Geo Quiz we wanted you to name an central European capital known for its spires. The answer is Prague, in the Czech Republic. A radio station there is at the center of a controversy over free speech. The World's David Leveille has the story.

Business, Finance & Economics

Geo answer

The answer to today's Geo Quiz is the independent state of Monaco. The Mediterranean city state's ruler Prince Albert II announced he's scrapping a multi-billion dollar plan to expand into the sea because of the global economic downturn. Anchor Marco Werman gets details from the Globe and Mail's European business reporter Eric Reguly.

Arts, Culture & Media

Global Hit

The World's Marco Werman explains how an international dance sound from Angola ended up in Portugal and took Europe by storm. The answer to today's Geo Quiz is Luanda, the capital of Angola.

Global Politics

Iranian diplomat defects

In the past year, three Iranian diplomats have resigned in protest against the government, and have asked for asylum in Europe. The latest defection came today. Correspondent Cyrus Farivar reports.

Global Politics

The significance of the 1967 borders

Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu says Israel would be generous with the size of a Palestinian state but that the border could not rest at pre-1967 lines. The World's Matthew Bell visits the West Bank to see how the Jewish residents there view the debate.