Africa

How new technologies are bringing water to the developing world

The introduction of better water management and water technology can change lives in places like Sub Saharan Africa. And it’s not just Sub Saharan Africa where water is a problem. The United Nations estimates that three-quarters of a billion people lack access to clean water and that almost two-point-five billion lack access to adequate sanitation. One solution to the problem may be through innovation and technology. Here's a look at three that are trying to make a difference.

Arts, Culture & Media

Why some Kenyan villagers take AK-47s to fetch water

On the border with South Sudan, is a Turkana village called Loblono, in Northern Kenya. These Turkana people have survived for centuries in one of the harshest landscapes on earth, the dry-as-a-bone desert that also stretches across South Sudan and Somalia. They live a nomadic lifestyle based on herding cattle, chasing the rain and the grasslands that sprout from the desert when it’s wet. The Turkana have always been in conflict with neighboring tribes, like the Poquot and the Taposas. But, in recent years, dwindling water supplies have exacerbated the conflict on this smallest of scales.

Conflict & Justice

How cement could de-rail the Gaza peace talks

With the cease-fire holding in Gaza, both sides are now facing the difficult task of negotiating a lasting truce. This involves huge political issues. But also some very mundane issues, which could de-rail any settlement. For instance, cement. Cement is obviously needed for reconstruction. But Israel doesn't want Hamas to re-build its tunnels.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'

Updated

Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Conflict & Justice

These photos show the missing Nigerian girls as real people, as individuals

Updated

It's been a month an a half since hundreds of Nigerian schoolgirls were abducted by the Islamist militant group, Boko Haram. But despite the global attention, we still know very little about the missing girls themselves. Glenna Gordon realized that although she could not photograph the girls, she could photograph their personal possessions as a way to highlight who they are.