Global Satire

Global Satire looks at world events through the lens of political cartoons, comedy, graphic journalism and wit (ha-ha and dark) in all its forms. Our focus is every corner of the globe. The idea is to explore what satirists around the world are poking fun at, or darkly laying bare. Our assumption is that a cartoon, joke, or wry comment can explain a vexing political issue as well (and often better) than any amount of punditry. Created by Carol Hills. 

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'

Updated

Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Global Politics

Three years on, an anonymous Tunisian satirist is still waiting for a political revolution in his country

Updated

Three years ago, a Tunisian architect was blogging anti-government sentiments anonymously from Paris. His views reflected those protesters in Tunisia who ushered in the Arab Spring. Today, the Tunisian blogger and cartoonist is still very much a part of the conversation about the future of his country. But he's still anonymous, and waiting hopefully for real political change to take place in his country.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'

Updated

Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Arts, Culture & Media

After a fracas over French 'male-only' prize for graphic novelists, world takes note of women artists

For 43 years, graphic novelists and comics artists have gathered in the French town of Angoulême to celebrate their burgeoning art and award prizes. But in all that time, only one woman has won the Grand Prix, a "lifetime achievement" award. After this year's list of 30 nominees contained no women at all, an uproar ensued.