Global Satire

Global Satire looks at world events through the lens of political cartoons, comedy, graphic journalism and wit (ha-ha and dark) in all its forms. Our focus is every corner of the globe. The idea is to explore what satirists around the world are poking fun at, or darkly laying bare. Our assumption is that a cartoon, joke, or wry comment can explain a vexing political issue as well (and often better) than any amount of punditry. Created by Carol Hills. 

Global Politics

Three years on, an anonymous Tunisian satirist is still waiting for a political revolution in his country


Three years ago, a Tunisian architect was blogging anti-government sentiments anonymously from Paris. His views reflected those protesters in Tunisia who ushered in the Arab Spring. Today, the Tunisian blogger and cartoonist is still very much a part of the conversation about the future of his country. But he's still anonymous, and waiting hopefully for real political change to take place in his country.

Arts, Culture & Media

Mandela's love for humor was on full display when he sat for an interview with 'Evita'


Nelson Mandela was many many things, among them a lover of humor and satire. He once sat down for a 30-minute TV interview with a man in a dress pretending to be an apartheid-era Afrikaner housewife. Mandela knew that talking to the fictitious Evita Bezuidenhout was going to reach more people than appearing on the nightly news. Satirist Pieter-Dirk Uys was the man behind Evita.

Arts, Culture & Media

'Thank you so much for giving us Muslims the freedom to take our giant cumbersome clocks to school'

Pakistani comedian Danish Ali wants to thank everyone for making it finally OK for Muslims to take their clocks with them wherever they go. His video riffing on the reaction to 14-year-old Ahmed Mohamed's arrest in Texas has reached about a half-million people and Ali hopes it will poke and prod the conversation about identity forward.

Conflict & Justice

Just a mile from Gaza, a Kibbutznik cartoonist holds steadfast to his left wing beliefs

For all of his 61 years, Israeli political cartoonist Arnon Avni has lived in a kibbutz just a mile from the Gaza Strip. He's proud of his left-wing roots and remains steadfast in his liberal politics but his expectations have changed. Avni no longer speaks realistically of peace with Palestinians. His hope these days is for a reconciliation between Arabs and Israelis, an agreement that they have two drastically different narratives and that both can be right.