Tunis

Global Politics

Three years on, an anonymous Tunisian satirist is still waiting for a political revolution in his country

Updated

Three years ago, a Tunisian architect was blogging anti-government sentiments anonymously from Paris. His views reflected those protesters in Tunisia who ushered in the Arab Spring. Today, the Tunisian blogger and cartoonist is still very much a part of the conversation about the future of his country. But he's still anonymous, and waiting hopefully for real political change to take place in his country.

Global Scan

The interpreter scandal at Mandela's memorial takes a bizarre turn

We are learning more about the fake interpreter for the deaf who signed gibberish during Mandela's memorial service. He may well have posed a security risk. We highlight an Ethiopian village that has found a path out of poverty, only to be resented by its neighbors. And Greenpeace activists are learning that being "free" on bail in Russia has its limits, in today's Global Scan.

Global Politics

Three years on, an anonymous Tunisian satirist is still waiting for a political revolution in his country

Updated

Three years ago, a Tunisian architect was blogging anti-government sentiments anonymously from Paris. His views reflected those protesters in Tunisia who ushered in the Arab Spring. Today, the Tunisian blogger and cartoonist is still very much a part of the conversation about the future of his country. But he's still anonymous, and waiting hopefully for real political change to take place in his country.

Global Politics

Three years on, an anonymous Tunisian satirist is still waiting for a political revolution in his country

Updated

Three years ago, a Tunisian architect was blogging anti-government sentiments anonymously from Paris. His views reflected those protesters in Tunisia who ushered in the Arab Spring. Today, the Tunisian blogger and cartoonist is still very much a part of the conversation about the future of his country. But he's still anonymous, and waiting hopefully for real political change to take place in his country.

Global Scan

The interpreter scandal at Mandela's memorial takes a bizarre turn

We are learning more about the fake interpreter for the deaf who signed gibberish during Mandela's memorial service. He may well have posed a security risk. We highlight an Ethiopian village that has found a path out of poverty, only to be resented by its neighbors. And Greenpeace activists are learning that being "free" on bail in Russia has its limits, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

Cyber attacks on Tunisia

The World's Clark Boyd tells how cyber attacks on Tunisia are linked to the country's human rights record. He interviews Slim Amamou, a Tunis-based tech entrepreneur and free speech activist who has now been arrested by Tunisian authorities.