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Global Scan

Scandinavians, for the first time, are joining the jihad

Scandinavia is known for its commitment to civil and human rights, its government services and its equality. But it's also becoming a source of jihadi fighters in Syria. Pro-Russian militants in Ukraine have secured a huge cache of weapons. And a white man and his black puppet are creating candid talk on race in South Africa. That and more, in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Conflict & Justice

New York City's hijacked hashtag launches a global conversation on police brutality

Updated

When the New York Police Department encouraged its followers on Twitter to share photos of themselves with NYPD officers, the result was not what they expected. Two days later, the hashtag has been mimicked in a half dozen cities around the world to showcase police brutality. But the social media effort has had another consequence: it has started a global dialogue about the perception of police and policing in different cities.

Arts, Culture & Media

A Russian writer who wrote about the absurdity of life now has a street in Queens named after him

Last week, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed legislation to rename 63 different thoroughfares and public places throughout the city. Soon, 63rd Drive in Queens will be the first city street named after a Russian writer — Sergei Dovlatov, whose stories appeared in the New Yorker. And his wife still lives there.

Global Politics

Ludmilla Petrushevskaya

For decades, the writer Ludmilla Petrushevskaya was banned in the Soviet Union. She wrote stories about domestic despair and Soviet censors demanded optimism. Today she's a living legend in Russia. Kiera Feldman reports.