Cambridge

Health & Medicine

Scientists discover a potent new antibiotic

Antibiotics, among the most extraordinary drugs of the last hundred years, mostly come from a very ordinary source: dirt. But that source has been slowly exhausted, since 99 percent of the microbes in dirt can't be cultured in a lab. Now, a group of scientists has developed a new technique for cultivating bacteria on their home turf, so to speak: right in the dirt, where they grow best. The results are a game-changer.

Lifestyle & Belief

You might want extra life insurance before trying some of the recipes in this cookbook

Since 1991, the Ig Nobel prizes have been awarded, tongue firmly in cheek, to researchers whose work "first makes you laugh, then makes you think." The theme of this year's Ig Nobel ceremony? Food. And with that, we have this review of the Ig Nobel Cookbook, Volume I.

Global Scan

An experiment in crowd-sourced news for China 'disappears' at the hands of government censors

China's not known for its press freedom — though its citizens are voracious consumers of news. A new site, Cenci, had taken the country's journalism world by storm ... until censors decided to make it invisible. Meanwhile in Boston, you can buy soup in bite-size, edible balls. It's a Harvard researcher's idea to cut plastic waste. Those stories and more in today's Global Scan.

Conflict & Justice

As we remember the Boston Marathon tragedy, should we try to forget the alleged bombers?

This weekend, a dancer and runner who lost her foot in the Boston Marathon bombing refused to go on a national television show about the tragedy without a guarantee — she didn't want the names of the alleged bombers mentioned. PRI's The World senior producer Jeb Sharp looks at why some people need to move on, while others still want to understand what happened.

Health & Medicine

Scientists discover a potent new antibiotic

Antibiotics, among the most extraordinary drugs of the last hundred years, mostly come from a very ordinary source: dirt. But that source has been slowly exhausted, since 99 percent of the microbes in dirt can't be cultured in a lab. Now, a group of scientists has developed a new technique for cultivating bacteria on their home turf, so to speak: right in the dirt, where they grow best. The results are a game-changer.